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Sunday, November 10
 

8:30am

Registration
Sunday November 10, 2019 8:30am - 2:30pm
TBA

9:30am

The Time is Short, The Task is Great: Jewish Responses to Climate Change
As scientists around the world have told us, we are in a state of climate emergency. The earth is calling out to us and Jewish tradition demands that we answer, as individuals and as a community. In this panel, three leading thinkers and activists from the Jewish environmental movement will discuss the crucial importance of a Jewish voice in this struggle, explain how the Toronto and North American Jewish community is currently responding to this crisis, and outline ways in which participants can act as Jews and as allies with other religious groups, to truly become “Shomrei Adamah”, guardians of the earth.

Speakers
avatar for Risa Alyson Cooper

Risa Alyson Cooper

Risa Alyson Cooper is Executive Director of Shoresh, a co-founder of Bela Farm, and the winner of the Covenant Foundation’s Pomegranate Prize for exceptionalism in Jewish Education. 
avatar for Andrea Most

Andrea Most

Andrea Most is Professor of American Literature, Environmental Studies, and Jewish Studies at the University of Toronto. Her work breaks down divisions between scholarship and public life, research and teaching, mind and body, nature and culture. Prof. Most teaches experiential courses... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 9:30am - 10:15am
J130

9:30am

"Theory as a Liberatory Practice": Queer Feminist Theory and Jewish Thought
In this presentation, we will use contemporary feminist and queer theory to think about the potential for Jewish and queer feminist thought to be read together, offering forms of resistance, healing, and liberation through theory as everyday practice.


Speakers
LZ

Laine Zisman Newman

Dr. Laine Zisman Newman received her PhD from the University of Toronto in Theatre and Sexual Diversity Studies. Her research focuses on queer and feminist media and performance in Canada. Zisman Newman was founder and chair of Toronto’s Queer Theory Working Group and co-founder... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 9:30am - 10:15am
P115

9:30am

Almost Within Reach: An Israeli Experience of Gaza
For many years, as an activist and then as a professional worker in human rights organizations, I tried to have a positive impact on the humanitarian crisis in Gaza through research and advocacy, while constantly struggling with what it means to be Israeli in this line of work: having the burden of what Gaza signifies to Israelis to unpack, while also not being able to go and experience Gaza, its beauty and challenges first hand. In this lecture, I will be sharing some of my experiences from this work, including co-authoring the B’Tselem submission to the Turkel Commission and witnessing reception (2010); Exploring how gender-blind policies that restrict movement to and from Gaza end up having a harsh impact on women (2014); and learning about the water crisis, its origins and its tragic impacts on the lives of some two million people (2014-16). After years of this work, a “aha moment” in 2017 led me to an unfortunate realization: The only time I had ever had a real, tangible positive impact on lives in Gaza was as an IDF officer. What did this mean about my complicated relationship with a place that was so elusively almost within reach?

Speakers
avatar for Naama Baumgarten-Sharon

Naama Baumgarten-Sharon

Naama Baumgarten-Sharon has been a peace and anti-occupation activist since she completed her military service as an intelligence officer in 2001, and has worked professionally for Israeli NGOs, most notably as a researcher at B'Tselem, and for international NGOs operating in Israel-Palestine... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 9:30am - 10:15am
P105

9:30am

The Power of One and the Power of Many - Finding Your Passion and Pursuing It: Lessons Learned from Looking a Nazi in the Eye and Working at the United Nations
This session will be an interactive discussion where I discuss my own experiences participating in the March of the Living, attending a Nazi trial, founding a non-profit, working at the United Nations and pursuing my seemingly impossible dreams. We will discuss finding our passions, pursuing them with action and claiming ownership over our own Jewish experiences and role in this world. Through learning from history and discovering our own mission we can all make a difference together.

Speakers
avatar for Jordana Lebowitz

Jordana Lebowitz

Jordana was inspired by participating in the March of the Living when she was 16, to become an advocate for Holocaust remembrance and human rights. She attended the trial of convicted former Nazi officer Oskar Groening in 2015 and co-authored a novel about her experiences there with... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 9:30am - 10:15am
J225

9:30am

The Devil We Know: The Evolution of 'Satan' in Jewish Textual History
This session will trace the evolution of the Jewish "Satan" (yes, we have one) – from merciful angel of divine redirection, to God's loyal prosecutor, to the socially familiar angelic reflection of "evil." Along the way, we'll observe how Jewish life is porous to other faiths' historical and doctrinal influences, and consider the spiritual implications for us 21st century moderns. Come for text study, history, philosophy and a few spiritual surprises.

Speakers
avatar for David Markus

David Markus

Rabbi David Markus, J.D., M.P.P., is North America’s only active pulpit rabbi also to hold a full-time oath of public office. He is Senior Rabbi of Temple Beth El of City Island (New York, NY); Senior Builder at Bayit: Building Jewish; rabbinics faculty at the Academy for Jewish... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 9:30am - 10:15am
P120

9:30am

Finding Purpose in a Godless World: Why We Care Even if the Universe Doesn't
Can there be purpose without God? This presentation is about how human purpose and caring, like consciousness and absolutely everything else in existence, could plausibly have emerged and evolved unguided, bottom-up, in a spontaneous universe.

Dr. Lewis examines science's inroads into the big questions that occupy religion and philosophy. He shows how our sense of purpose and meaning is entangled with mistaken intuitions that events in our lives happen for some intended cosmic reason and that the universe itself has inherent purpose. Dispelling this illusion, and integrating the findings of numerous scientific fields, he shows how not only the universe, life, and consciousness but also purpose, morality, and meaning could, in fact, have emerged and evolved spontaneously and unguided. There is persuasive evidence that these qualities evolved naturally and without mystery, biologically and culturally, in humans as conscious, goal-directed social animals.

This presentation will argue that the scientific worldview of an unguided, spontaneous universe is not just awe-inspiring but foundational to building a more compassionate society.

Speakers
avatar for Ralph Lewis

Ralph Lewis

Ralph Lewis, MD, is a psychiatrist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, Canada; an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Toronto; and a psycho-oncology consultant at the Odette Cancer Centre in Toronto.In his clinical practice, he helps... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 9:30am - 10:15am
J125

9:30am

Golden Age Travel
What if Hebrew poet Yehuda HaLevi, born 1070, Spain, came to Toronto today? “Golden Age Travel” is a play about time travel, in which HaLevi, at a crisis in his own life, accepts the invite of a 21st century Toronto Jew, YYZ.

In Toronto, HaLevi grapples with the great changes in Jewish history, especially Israel’s establishment. What a contrast to his time, when Crusader Christians and Muslims fought over Jerusalem. But when HaLevi attempts to board a plane for Israel (paralleling the pilgrimage to Jerusalem HaLevi undertook in 1140) he is arrested for travelling under false identity. Court refers him to a psychiatrist to determine his sanity (he claims to be a famous 12th century poet - sounds crazy!)

So the second grappling is in dialogue between HaLevi and Dr. Miri Maimenbaum, court psychiatrist. This parallels the dialogue of HaLevi’s philosophical work, The Kuzari, between King of the Khazars and a learned Jew.  Dr. Maimenbaum’s rationalist outlook mirrors Rambam, in contrast with HaLevi’s mystical, nationalist, romantic outlook. Dialogue explores issues of identity: who we are based on what we believe; and our narratives - the stories we tell ourselves, personally and collectively. A staged reading of portions of the play.

Speakers
avatar for Benjamin Rubin

Benjamin Rubin

Benjamin Rubin is a Toronto lawyer by trade. Under his pen name, eBenBrandeis, he composes poetry, lyrics and YouTube video poems. He has edited and published a book of contemporary Jewish humor; translated from Hebrew an autobiography of life in pre-war Pinsk, Poland; was the creator... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 9:30am - 10:15am
J140

9:30am

Calling People In: Fighting Antisemitism Through Relationship
"Fighting" antisemitism on campus could involve filing complaints, creating protests, petitioning, and involving police or administration. We'll discuss what a relationship-based alternative approach might look like, building relationships across difference to increase understanding and collaboration. We'll look at Jewish texts for inspiration and discuss methods for relationship-building, feedback, and allyship that work. We'll also look at case studies to apply our new techniques.

Speakers
avatar for Julia Appel

Julia Appel

Rabbi Julia Appel currently serves as the Senior Jewish Educator and Campus Rabbi for Hillel at the University of Toronto. A frequent contributor to the CJN, Rabbi Appel serves on the Executive of the Toronto Board of Rabbis. Her fields of interest are young adult outreach, institutional... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 9:30am - 10:15am
J230

10:30am

Baghdad to Bukhara: a Journey Celebrating the Power of Poetry
TBA

Speakers
avatar for Yvonne Green

Yvonne Green

Born in London England in 1957, Yvonne Green practiced at the bar in London and New York until she retired to publish the poems she’d always written. Since then, Yvonne has won honours for 5  books of her poetry! She's been broadcast on BBC Radio and YouTube.The daughter of a Central... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 10:30am - 11:15am
P120

10:30am

More Than Oy Vey: Why We Need More Diversity of Jewish Grandparents in Today’s Picture Books.
The Greater Toronto Area represents 51% of all of Canada’s Jewish population—but our community is in no way homogenous. Jewish people come from all over the globe: South Africa, Argentina, Israel, Russia, Haiti, England, South Korea. Some are first-generation Canadian, others have been here for over a century. But review a collection of recently published Jewish picture books and this diversity is not represented—especially when it comes to grandparents. This presentation will look at the depiction of Jewish grandparents in eight recent picture books and show how these characters add to the monolithic narrative of the North American Jewish experience through their language, traditional role, and immigrant backstory. Participants will be asked to consider their own story and why now, more than ever, we need to diversify the Jewish experience narrative that we’re telling our children.

Speakers
avatar for Sidura Ludwig

Sidura Ludwig

Sidura Ludwig is a fiction writer, freelance editor and communications specialist. Her novel HOLDING MY BREATH was published in 2007. Her forthcoming collection of short stories, YOU ARE NOT WHAT WE EXPECTED will be published by House of Anansi Press, May 2020. She is currently working... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 10:30am - 11:15am
P105

10:30am

Between The Dome of the Rock and a Hard Place
On my college campus, relationships between institutional Jewish and Muslim life were nearly non-existent. I had a part to play in the acrimony. So how was it that, less than two decades later, I found myself working in Jewish spaces? This is the story of the past, present and future of Jewish-Muslim dialogue as I understand it, what might be the most important interfaith conversation of our time.


Speakers
avatar for Haroon Moghul

Haroon Moghul

Haroon Moghul is a Fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute of North America. He's been published widely, including by the New York Times, Washington Post, TIME, CNN, and Foreign Policy, and contributed original content to NPR's Fresh Air. In 2016, he was honored with the Religion News... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 10:30am - 11:15am
J140

10:30am

Constructing Diaspora Identity in the Second Temple Period
It is often assumed that Diaspora Jewish identity emerged only after the Destruction of the Second Temple in 70 CE. However, a wide-spread Jewish Diaspora existed for centuries during the Second Temple period. How did those Diaspora Jews view themselves vis-à-vis the Homeland, the Jewish-Hasmonean state and the Temple with which they co-existed? Did they see themselves as “second-class Jews” or did they construct their own unique Jewish identity? Furthermore, is Diaspora defined geographically, or could there be a Diaspora identity within “the Land”? These questions will be discussed through an examination of a variety of Second Temple period texts, including the books of the Maccabees and other Apocryphal books, and Hellenistic Jewish authors, primarily Flavius Josephus.

Speakers
avatar for Nadav Sharon

Nadav Sharon

Nadav Sharon holds a PhD in the history of the Jewish people in the Second Temple period (Hebrew University in Jerusalem, 2013). His research and publications focus on issues such as Jewish-non-Jewish relations, Second Temple period biblical interpretation and rewriting, and literary... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 10:30am - 11:15am
J225

10:30am

Spiritual Care
Speakers

Sunday November 10, 2019 10:30am - 11:15am
J125

10:30am

Artificial Intelligence and Jewish Theology
The field of artificial intelligence has advanced considerably over the last decade, with major implications for nations and individuals alike. In this class, we'll discuss how artificial intelligence interacts with Jewish notions of humanity's uniqueness and what kind of ethic Judaism might suggest for AI development and implementation in the future.

Speakers
avatar for David Zvi Kalman

David Zvi Kalman

David Zvi Kalman recently received his doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania. His major areas of research are Jewish history, the history of technology, and Islamic jurisprudence. His is the owner of Print-O-Craft Press and creator of the podcasts The Joy of Text, Talking... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 10:30am - 11:15am
J130

10:30am

Learning to Cope: Uncovering Anxiety and How to Manage It
Anxiety is a prevalent and significant problem affecting one in five children and teens. Mental health issues, particularly anxiety, lead to physical, cognitive and behavioural difficulties. Often, anxiety issues are undiagnosed or, worse, misdiagnosed. Identifying, understanding and treating anxiety can position a child for growth and success. “Learning to Cope: Uncovering Anxiety and How to Manage It” is a workshop for anyone who lives or works with children and teens. There is help and there is hope for individuals who suffer from anxiety.

Speakers
avatar for Leanne Matlow

Leanne Matlow

Leanne is a cognitive behavioural therapy counsellor with a private practice specializing in anxiety for children and adolescents. She is trained as a teacher and guidance counsellor, with a Masters degree from Toronto’s Institute of Child Study, OISE and certificates in CBT from... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 10:30am - 11:15am
P115

10:30am

“Yom Kippur in a Gym”: What Five Random People in a Novel Are Really Thinking About On Yom Kippur (Hint: it’s not only teshuva or God)
My new (not yet published) novel, Yom Kippur in a Gym, follows five random people at a Yom Kippur service that is set in a gym not unlike the one at the Miles Nadal JCC. This book reveals what these five fascinating characters are really thinking about, feeling, and experiencing during Yom Kippur. Each individual is struggling – spiritually, religiously, existentially, emotionally – with a particular issue. These five people are strangers to each other, but because of something that happens during the service, they end up meeting, and have surprising interactions that will affect all their lives.

There are religious, spiritual, and personal issues in this book that will be easy to relate to for anyone who has ever sat in a Yom Kippur service and tried to engage with it in a meaningful way. I will present some of these issues, relating each of them to a character in the book, and will illustrate my points by reading a few brief passages. The first half of our hour together will be a presentation, but the second half will be a discussion with everyone present about the religious and spiritual issues that have been introduced.

Speakers
avatar for Nora Gold

Nora Gold

Dr. Nora Gold is a writer, activist, and the creator and editor of the prestigious online literary journal, Jewish Fiction .net. Her latest novel, The Dead Man, won a Translation Grant from Canada Council for the Arts and will be published soon in Hebrew in Israel. Her Fields of Exile... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 10:30am - 11:15am
J230

11:30am

TBA
TBA


Speakers
avatar for Daniel Korobkin

Daniel Korobkin

Rabbi N. Daniel Korobkin is mara d’asra (senior rabbi) of Beth Avraham Yoseph of Toronto Congregation (“The BAYT”).  He received his rabbinic ordination from HaRav Yaakov Ruderman zt”l, of Ner Israel Rabbinic College.  He has served pulpits in San Diego,  Los Angeles, and... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:15pm
J140

11:30am

A Jewish Conception of Universal Human Rights and International Justice

The presentation will explore how Judaism can be a source of inspiration for commitment to universal and progressive values, particularly the notion of human rights. The speakers will delve into the religious, historical and philosophical underpinnings of a uniquely Jewish conception of human rights and international justice. The speakers will also discuss how their own Jewish identities have been integral to their dedication to international human rights advocacy.

Speakers
avatar for Yonah Diamond

Yonah Diamond

Yonah Diamond and Brandon Silver work at the Raoul Wallenberg Centre for Human Rights under the leadership of the Honourable Irwin Cotler. They focus on shining a spotlight on pressing international human rights issues and advocating for the release of prisoners of conscience around... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:15pm
J225

11:30am

Finding the “I” in Identity
How do we grapple with our intersecting and sometimes conflicting identities? Can certain identities be conflicting if one person holds them all? How do our identities and ideologies affect how we choose our Jewish communities? What does Jewish tradition have to say? This will be an exploration of contemporary issues through the lens of ancient Jewish texts to produce a diverse, nuanced, and productive conversation - one that so many are craving to have in person and off social media. The goal is to engage with one another to promote productive dialogue on important issues and to educate ourselves on identity politics. We will explore questions relating to communal expectations, litmus tests, privilege, intersectionality, and more.

Speakers
avatar for Daphne Lazar Price

Daphne Lazar Price

Daphne stepped into the role of Executive Director of the Jewish Orthodox Feminist Alliance (JOFA) after years of experience in the Jewish non-profit world. She has partnered extensively with lay leaders and professionals.Daphne worked at the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:15pm
J125

11:30am

Not About Us Without Us
Jewish spaces should be welcoming spaces for all Jews. Sometimes we have excluded Jews from sharing our spaces. We are proud of being an inclusive people but we need to “walk the walk”. We will have an interactive conversation and discuss our experiences from an LGBTQIA+ and Jew of Colour perspective. Drawing from our thousands of years of traditions until 2019, we will offer practical and useful tools to activate your space!

Speakers
avatar for Dara Lithwick

Dara Lithwick

Dara LithwickDara Lithwick is passionate about all things Jewish – the religion, the culture, the food, and the people. She is an advocate for LGBTQIA+ inclusion within diverse Jewish spaces and is currently serving as a Union for Reform Judaism JewV’Nation fellow as part of its... Read More →
avatar for Rivka Campbell

Rivka Campbell

Rivka Campbell Rivka, a Jew of Jamaican descent born and raised in Toronto, seeks to build community among Jews of Colour in Canada while opening dialogue among the mainstream Jewish community about the experience of Jews of Colour and Jewish Diversity. She is the co-founder of the... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:15pm
J130

11:30am

Alexander Pecherky Hero of the Sobibor Uprising: Facts and Fictions
Was Alexander “Sasha” Pechersky a Russian, a Soviet or a Jewish hero? Why was he long-forgotten and why was he the subject of so much attention in Russia last year? And what does his life teach us about the Holocaust and about Soviet Jews? David Bezmozgis, author of Natasha and Other Stories, The Free World, The Betrayers, and Immigrant City, traveled to Rostov-on-Don and Moscow to learn about Pechersky and to write the first authoritative account about his life in English.

Speakers
avatar for David Bezmozgis

David Bezmozgis

David Bezmozgis is an award-winning writer and filmmaker. He is the author of two story collections, Natasha and Other Stories (2004) and Immigrant City: Stories (2019) and the novels, The Free World (2011), and The Betrayers (2014).David’s stories have appeared in numerous publications... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:15pm
P120

11:30am

Welcoming the Stranger: Jewish Responsibility in the Torah and Today
Welcoming the stranger is one of Judaism’s most long-standing virtues. The commandment to be hospitable appears in the Torah no fewer than 36 times and in a multitude of ways: "do not wrong or oppress the stranger," "welcome the stranger," and even "love the stranger."

This session will include a text study of some of these references, and explore their relevance to today's Jewish responses to the world refugee crisis, including the role of Jews in the Toronto community in sponsoring and resettling refugees in partnership with JIAS (Jewish Immigrant Aid Services) Toronto.

Speakers
avatar for Jodi Block

Jodi Block

Jodi Block has worked at JIAS (Jewish Immigrant Aid Services) Toronto for 15 years and in a number of capacities, helping to welcome and connect new immigrants to the Jewish community and to Toronto.  At the height of the Syrian refugee crisis, Jodi was part of the JIAS Toronto team... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:15pm
P115

11:30am

Einstein and the Rabbi: The Untold Story of His Friendship with Rabbi Chaim Tchernowitz, and Their Conversations About the Talmud, Zionism, and God
It sounds like fiction, but is in fact history: Albert Einstein, the fabled physicist, forged an abiding friendship and correspondence with an eclectic Orthodox rabbi, Chaim Tchernowitz. Beginning with their first meeting at Einstein’s summer home outside Berlin, we’ll chart their unlikely story, which spanned two continents and two decades. Along the way, you’ll learn why Einstein wrote a public letter praising the Talmud—even though he couldn’t read it—and how he opposed an early attempt to depose the first president of Hebrew University for his heterodox political views.

Speakers
avatar for Yair Rosenberg

Yair Rosenberg

Yair Rosenberg is a senior writer at Tablet Magazine, where he covers the intersection of politics, culture, and religion. His work has also appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, and The Guardian, and his writings have received awards... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:15pm
P105

11:30am

Teaching our Children to Swim - How to Deal with Danger and Doubt
Much of Jewish family life and education is built on acquainting our children with the strengths and beauties of our tradition and persuading them to follow this way of life.
But we know it doesn’t work for all children, all of the time. Nor may it equip our children to face the physical, mental and spiritual dangers they may encounter.
Some will say adding darker questions and topics may undermine the goals of making our children into the next generation of Jews. But that risk and others are already out there. They include:
1. Giving our children mental or religious pabulum;
2. Expecting teen-aged children and young adults to face the attractive questions and ideologies they encounter in the wider world without a solid intellectual and argumentative repertoire;
3. Depriving them of an adult version of our tradition.
But what if by omitting troubling questions we are not helping our children and students but actually hurting them by omission?
And if we do introduce difficult topics, at what age and in what complexity?
Today’s session will be a combination of presentation and workshop with texts, letting us define and start to address these issues.

Speakers
avatar for Nancy Wallack

Nancy Wallack

Sometime professor of English and American literature. Grew up with first generation American immigrants from eastern and western Europe; also, Reform with an Orthodox grandmother. Wandered in the desert (atheism, agnosticism) and found Sinai again. Adult Jewish learner and teach... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 11:30am - 12:15pm
J230

12:30pm

1:30pm

Jewish American Influence On American Popular Music, 1880-2000
The course delves into little known plethora of information about the remarkable cultural influence of Jewish Americans. I am using YouTube videos, clips from DVDs and CDs in presenting the course. In addition, I also found some unforgettable quotes to help you get inside the minds and hearts of those characters we will be exploring. While the focus of course is music, it is inextricably linked to American history including antisemitism, racism, gangsters, the prohibition, etc.
We will begin by exploring how the Russian/Polish Jews who immigrated to America in large numbers between 1880 and 1920, came to dominate music, Hollywood and much more. We will meet Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern, Louis Armstrong, George Gershwin, Harold Arlan and Yip Harburg, Mike Stoller and Jerry Leiber, Elvis Presley, the Chess brothers, Bob Dylan and many others.

Speakers
avatar for Allan Cheskes

Allan Cheskes

Currently, semi-retired. Part-time instructor at Seneca School of Accounting and Business. I do some consulting, as a retired partner of DeloitteI am a former President of Beth Sholom and am still actively involved with Beth Sholom and the community. I have been the CFO for all of... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
J125

1:30pm

Allyship as Spiritual Practice
Being an ally can sometimes feel awkward and unsustainable. How might we see allyship as part of a restorative religion that is nourishing? We will explore models of change that aim to balance the solo and communal contributions of allyship as spiritual practice.

Speakers
avatar for Mike Moskowitz

Mike Moskowitz

Rabbi Mike Moskowitz is the Scholar-in-Residence for Trans and Queer Jewish Studies at Congregation Beit Simchat Torah in New York, NY. He is a deeply traditional and radically progressive advocate for trans rights and a vocal ally for LGBTQ inclusivity. Rabbi Moskowitz received three... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
P115

1:30pm

Jewish Settlements in Palestine : 1870-1914
Many of you have visited Israel and have been to Rehovot, Rishon LeZion, Rosh Pina, Petah Tikva and Gedera. However, did you ever consider how and why these places were established? This session will discuss the historical and social development of over 40 settlements or colonies established in Palestine between 1870 and 1914. Many of these settlements were supported by Baron Edmund Rothschild and other organizations such the JCA, BILU,JNF and the AIU. This session will examine the reasons for the establishment of these settlements and how they functioned. There will also be discussion, through the use of PowerPoint and original historical documents, about the role of the First and Second Aliyah and various colonists in the future establishment of the State of Israel. The session will also show the importance of postcards, photographs and travel guides in assisting us to preserve memories of this historical period.

Speakers
avatar for Ed Kroft

Ed Kroft

Ed Kroft Q.C. FRSPCEd Kroft is a lawyer who resides in Vancouver . He is the President of the Royal Philatelic Society of Canada (RPSC) and past President of the Society of Israel Philatelists (SIP). One of his passions and collecting interests relates to the Jewish settlements in... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
J230

1:30pm

Building Resilience on Campus: Muslim and Jewish Student Perspectives
Over the past year, students from the Muslim and Jewish campus communities have come together around various events in support of each other. Often these moments are in trying and difficult times, but we are working together to build bridges that extend beyond supporting each other after traumatic events. We will be discussing the challenges we face on campus as a group, and how we can help and support each other effectively.

Speakers
avatar for Chaim Grafstein

Chaim Grafstein

Chaim is a PhD Student at the University of Toronto in the Department of Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations.


Sunday November 10, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
J130

1:30pm

How 'Why' Grew Up: The Evolving Divine Call for Sacred Relationship in the Book of Genesis
We humans are wired to ask "why." The question, by definition seeks meaning in the context of relationship – ideas core to Judaism and all sacred traditions. But like everything else, these traditions and even the "why" itself had to be created. Looking to Torah's book of creation (Genesis), how did "why" happen? How did "why" grow up? We'll trace the early Biblical history of "why" – from a primordial rhetorical question toward an ever fuller human relationship with the holy – and ask what Torah's history of "why" can mean for spiritual seekers today.

Speakers
avatar for David Markus

David Markus

Rabbi David Markus, J.D., M.P.P., is North America’s only active pulpit rabbi also to hold a full-time oath of public office. He is Senior Rabbi of Temple Beth El of City Island (New York, NY); Senior Builder at Bayit: Building Jewish; rabbinics faculty at the Academy for Jewish... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
P105

1:30pm

Is it OK to assume that all Bibles are the same?
Whether we look at the Hebrew Bible text or its accompanying interpretations, there is much to say about the evolution of the text and its commentaries within Rabbinic circles over the last 2000 years. This session will present evidence of textual variations in the Bible and demonstrate editorial (religio-political) control of the commentaries presented for community study. Knowledge of Hebrew is NOT a requirement.

Speakers
avatar for Barry Levy

Barry Levy

B. Barry Levy is Emeritus Professor of Jewish Studies and Bible Interpretation at McGill U. Barry has taught since the 70s and has recently retired to Toronto with his family. He is the author of 'Fixing God's Torah - The Accuracy of the Hebrew Bible Text in Jewish Law', 2001 as well... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
J225

1:30pm

Denominational Judaism
TBA

Speakers
avatar for Jesse Shore

Jesse Shore

Jesse Shore is graduate of Yeshiva University where he pursued a Masters in Bible and Rabbinic Ordination. His interests are in analytic philosophy and rabbinic literature. He currently serves as the assistant rabbi for Shaarei Shomayim Congregation in Toronto.


Sunday November 10, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
J140

1:30pm

How Jews and Muslims can learn to see the world through each other's eyes.
How Jews and Muslims can learn to see the world through each other's eyes
Despite our outsize presence in the headlines, Jews and Muslims comprise just a fraction of the North American population, making up around 5 percent of both the United States and Canada. In practice, this means that most people have never met a Muslim or a Jew, and that most Muslims and Jews never meet the other. As a result, both communities too often view each other purely through the lens of political and religious controversies, particularly surrounding Israel, rather than as friends and fellow citizens. This panel is about Muslims and Jews who are working to change that.

Speakers
avatar for Yair Rosenberg

Yair Rosenberg

Yair Rosenberg is a senior writer at Tablet Magazine, where he covers the intersection of politics, culture, and religion. His work has also appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, and The Guardian, and his writings have received awards... Read More →
avatar for Haroon Moghul

Haroon Moghul

Haroon Moghul is a Fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute of North America. He's been published widely, including by the New York Times, Washington Post, TIME, CNN, and Foreign Policy, and contributed original content to NPR's Fresh Air. In 2016, he was honored with the Religion News... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 1:30pm - 2:15pm
P120

2:30pm

Religion vs Humanity in Shtisel
The Haredi community in Shtisel is not the central subject, but one example of a wider issue in familial, political and religious constructions. The severely flawed central figure, Shulem, personifies the weakness of any patriarchal system. His authority severely damages his children's lives, even into adulthood, and severely harms his mother. His lying to others leads him to a tragic self-deception at the end of the second season. Son Akiva represents the opposite to authority, an open sensitivity that finds life in making art. The drama parallels religion and art as alternative discoveries of the eternal in the particular. As there is a spectrum among the artists there is a parallel spectrum among the parents and among the application of religious rules. The drama's myriad details combine to form a remarkable, elegant construction of interlocking ironies and reflections.

Speakers
avatar for Maurice Yacowar

Maurice Yacowar

Maurice Yacowar is Professor Emeritus (English and Film Studies) at The University of Calgary. In his 44-year academic career he was Dean of Humanities at Brock University (St. Catharines, Ontario), Dean of Academic Affairs at Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design (Vancouver, BC... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 2:30pm - 3:15pm
P120

2:30pm

Science and Spirituality in a Jewish Novel
Come learn about a novel based on the true story of a gifted Holocaust survivor and chemist. In the cutthroat, highly politicized world of cancer research, an Italian Jewish survivor made one of the key discoveries in twentieth-century medicine, only to be ignored until decades after his death. I will speak about the process of turning an important life story into novelistic art. A short reading from this work-in-progress will be followed by discussion of a key theme in the novel, which is how the Jewish spiritual world might be understood by a world-class scientist.

Speakers
avatar for Leora Freedman

Leora Freedman

Leora Freedman is the author of three published novels. Her work has won awards in Israel from the Committee for the Absorption of Outstanding Immigrant Artists and the President’s Fund. Her most recent novel was nominated for the National Indie Excellence Award in the US. She is... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 2:30pm - 3:15pm
J230

2:30pm

A Sacred Trust: Judaism and the Ethics of Power
Countless moments of Jewish history have pivoted upon questions of power and powerlessness. This dynamic, between the vulnerability of living under unfriendly authorities to the sudden weight and privilege of having our own State, has prompted deep Jewish thinking about the ethical use of power. Through conversation and study, explore how Judaism might provide tools for reflecting upon one's place in the world, spiritual motivation for achieving success, Jewish ways of being of service to others, and how the relationship between humility and ambition might influence a leader's thinking and conduct, with potential outcomes both personal and collective.

Speakers
avatar for Menachem Creditor

Menachem Creditor

Rabbi Menachem Creditor is the Pearl and Ira Meyer Scholar-in-Residence at UJA-Federation New York and the founder of Rabbis Against Gun Violence. He has published 20 books and six albums of original Jewish music, including “None Shall Make Them Afraid” and “Olam Chesed Yibaneh... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 2:30pm - 3:15pm
P115

2:30pm

Ethics and National Security policy: Can they be Reconciled?
Ethics and national security policy: Can they be reconciled?
Within the wide body of literature on Jewish ethics, four imperatives stand out: chesed, selfless acts of kindness; emet, truth; tzedek, righteousness or justice; and shalom, peace. We are admonished to use these ethical traits as guideposts in our private lives, which is often quite challenging. It is even more challenging when considering how to make national security decisions conform to these ethical principles. This presentation will examine a number of contemporary policy issues to see whether and how ethics and national security interests can be reconciled. 


Speakers
avatar for Dan Kurtzer

Dan Kurtzer

Daniel C. Kurtzer is the S. Daniel Abraham Professor of Middle East Policy Studies at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. During a 29-year career in the U.S. Foreign Service, Ambassador Kurtzer served as the U.S. Ambassador to Israel... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 2:30pm - 3:15pm
J140

2:30pm

Navigating Israel through Memory, Modernity and Moral Compass
This will be an interactive and facilitated discussion on how we navigate a sense of connection and identity with State of Israel through the lens of Israeli and Diaspora perspectives. We will unpack our discussion in four key areas that both challenge and unify the State of Israel: Democracy, Normalization, Holiness and Guardianship. Using the model of Avraham Infeld’s 5 Legged Table of what comprises a strong and stable Jewish identity, Memory, Family, Mount Sinai, Israel and Hebrew Language, we will explore where our personal compass and identity may coincide or collide with our Jewish one and our connections with the State of Israel.

Speakers
avatar for Ya'ara Saks

Ya'ara Saks

Ya’ara Saks is a writer, communications specialist and political analyst. A Canadian and Israeli citizen raised in both countries, she has worked in Israel and Canada in politics as a consultant in advisory roles for policy, communications and project management. She holds a Master’s... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 2:30pm - 3:15pm
J125

2:30pm

"I always wondered why we couldn't have more children": Women's Experiences of Infertility after the Shoah
Dr. Peggy J. Kleinplatz is collaborating on an investigation of forced Nazi medical/pharmaceutical interventions against women during the Holocaust - without their knowledge, let alone their consent. The focus of the research is on the administration of substances to women which led to amenorrhea (abnormal absence of menstruation) and for some, infertility. Kleinplatz has been interviewing women in Canada, the US and Israel in Yiddish, English and Hebrew who have waited a lifetime to tell their stories of multiple miscarriages and infertility after the Shoah. Of the many women interviewed, 100% had ceased menstruation immediately after their arrival in the camps. Ironically, this history has been hidden in plain sight precisely because of the routine or even hidden nature of these medical interventions. Survivors were trying to make sense of a set of events that have barely been mentioned, let alone understood, in the history of the Holocaust. They have long hoped that someone would investigate their experiences and stop attributing their difficulties to "psychosomatic trauma" or prior malnutrition. It is time to give voice to women's narratives. This study has been supported by a grant from the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (“The Claims Conference”).

Speakers
avatar for Peggy Kleinplatz

Peggy Kleinplatz

Peggy J. Kleinplatz, Ph.D. is Professor of Medicine, and Director of Sex and Couples Therapy Training at the University of Ottawa. She is a clinical psychologist, Certified in Sex Therapy and Education.  Since 1983, she has been teaching Human Sexuality at the University of Ottawa... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 2:30pm - 3:15pm
J130

2:30pm

Female Rabbis: Agents of Change/Preservers of Tradition
Female Rabbis generally live the paradox of being agents of change whose job is to teach an unchanging text. They are expected to preserve an ancient tradition which sometimes feels like it has not room for their own female perspective. This panel of five path-breaking female Rabbis: Reform, Conservative, Reconstructionist, and the first Orthodox ordained woman to use the title Rabbi, plus the moderator who has forged her Rabbinic path non-denominationally - will share insights, experiences, and ideas for the future. With Rabbis Elyse Goldstein, Lila Kagedan, Tina Grimberg and Jennifer Gorman. Moderated by Rabbi Julia Appel.

Speakers
avatar for Tina Grimberg

Tina Grimberg

Tina Grimberg grew up in the Ukrainian city of Kiev.  She moved to North America with her family when she was sixteen, and immediately became involved in the Jewish community of Indianapolis.  She received her rabbinic ordination from Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religions... Read More →
avatar for Elyse Goldstein

Elyse Goldstein

Rabbi Elyse Goldstein founded City Shul (www.cityshul.com), downtown Toronto's Reform congregation, in 2011 after 20 years as Rabbinic Director of Kolel. She is the volunteer and founding Rabbi of Adat Israel: Asociacion Judía Reformista de Guatemala and has officiated at over 30... Read More →
avatar for Lila Kagedan

Lila Kagedan

Rabbi Lila Kagedan is a dual Canadian and American citizen, the first Orthodox woman to adopt the title of rabbi. Rabbi Kagedanholds degrees and certificates from Midreshet Lindenbaum, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The University of Toronto, Harvard University, The Medstar Washington... Read More →
avatar for Julia Appel

Julia Appel

Rabbi Julia Appel currently serves as the Senior Jewish Educator and Campus Rabbi for Hillel at the University of Toronto. A frequent contributor to the CJN, Rabbi Appel serves on the Executive of the Toronto Board of Rabbis. Her fields of interest are young adult outreach, institutional... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 2:30pm - 3:15pm
P105

2:30pm

Lost Letters, Found Voices: Women’s Voices from the Cairo Geniza
The greatest discovery in the history of Jewish studies has been the magnificent treasure trove of medieval documents found in what’s known as the Cairo Geniza. There are hundreds of thousands of primary sources which were lost to history for a thousand years, thrown away as trash; but through improbable circumstances including twin sisters, daring rescues, arid weather, and scholarly chutzpah, they were discovered and rescued in modern times. These hand-written documents - letters, contracts, poems, scholarship and more - reveal a hidden world never before seen. They give direct voice to those, such as women, whose voices would otherwise have been lost to history. In this workshop, we will trace the unusual circumstances of the geniza’s discovery, analyze fascinating primary sources from women, and discuss the implications of having this transformative trove now in our hands.

Speakers
avatar for Judith Shapero

Judith Shapero

Judith Shapero, Educational Consultant at the Legacy Heritage Instructional Leadership Institute, has directed numerous initiatives in the field of innovative Jewish education and leadership. She is a senior educational leader, having been Principal, Vice Principal, Curriculum Developer... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 2:30pm - 3:15pm
J225

3:30pm

The Jewish Experience in Canada Today
The basic demographics are captured every few years through the national census that identifies who self-identifies as Jewish, where they live, and such basic characteristics as age, gender and educational attainment. But what about Jewish identity, practices, values and experiences? Such information has never been collected on a national scale, and is becoming increasingly important given the dynamic changes taking place in society, and in the Jewish community. In 2013, the Pew Research Center conducted a comprehensive survey of American Jews, and the results raised important questions in this country about how our own population may be similar of different.

In 2018, a major survey of the Canadian Jewish population was conducted to address this basic question, led by the non-profit Environics Institute for Survey Research, in partnership with the University of Toronto and York University. The study covers the Jewish population in Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg and Vancouver (comprising more than 80% of Canada’s Jewish population), and addresses such topics as Jewish identity and practice, childhood upbringing, experiences with anti-Semitism, and connections to Israel. This presentation will provide a general overview of the research, and cover selected insights.



Speakers
avatar for Keith Neuman

Keith Neuman

Keith Neuman, Ph.D. is Senior Associate with the Environics Institute, a non-profit research organization founded in 2006 to promote public opinion and social research on important issues of public policy and social change in Canada. The Institute uses public opinion research as a... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 3:30pm - 3:45pm
P105

3:30pm

Making New Jewish Art from Traces of a Jewish Past in Poland
MI POLIN (Hebrew for “from Poland”) is the first Judaica company established in Poland since World War II. MI POLIN’s founders, Helena Czernek and Aleksander Prugar, see their work as a way of strengthening their Polish-Jewish identity, extending the legacy of 1,000 years of Jewish life and creativity in Poland until today. Their passion project has taken them across the country in search of traces of mezuzot still found on doorposts of homes, gateways and apartments. Over the last six years, Helena and Aleksander have driven over 50,000 kilometers and visited over 70 cities and towns with their journeys extending into the Ukraine, Belarus and Romania. When they discover a trace of mezuzah that once hung there, they make a mold of the space left behind and cast a new bronze mezuzah, creating a positive shape from the negative space. They have created more than 100 mezuzahs, often visiting a new city at the request of descendants of Polish-Jewish families around the world. Each trip is followed up with archival research, unlocking the stories of the Jewish families that once lived in these homes. Join Warsaw-based artists Helena and Aleksander for an illustrated presentation on their adventures through former Jewish communities into bustling shops, abandoned buildings and quiet courtyards, interacting with locals and returning relatives. It’s a surprising and inspiring story of making Jewish art in Poland today.

Speakers
avatar for Aleksander Prugar

Aleksander Prugar

MI POLIN (Hebrew for “From Poland”) is the first Judaica company in Poland since World War II. MI POLIN is run by accomplished artist Helena Czernek and Aleksander Prugar, an award-winning photojournalist. Their original Jewish ritual objects are in the permanent collection of... Read More →
avatar for Helena Czernek

Helena Czernek

MI POLIN (Hebrew for “From Poland”) is the first Judaica company in Poland since World War II. MI POLIN is run by accomplished artist Helena Czernek and Aleksander Prugar, an award-winning photojournalist. Their original Jewish ritual objects are in the permanent collection of... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 3:30pm - 4:15pm
J140

3:30pm

Choosing Judaism: The Example of Los Neuvos Judios de Guatemala
Why would someone choose Judaism at all? Especially in an isolated place where there are few other Jews, no Jewish books, events, or even a deli? An entire community has arisen in Guatemala who found Reform Judaism through the internet and through other converts. Come and share their passion and, through their choice, ask if, how and what you would do to "choose Judaism" for yourself. We will see a. beautiful 20 minute documentary made at the last set of conversions at Adat Israel: Asociacion Judía Reformista de Guatemala as a starting point, and then discuss conversion in general.

Speakers
avatar for Elyse Goldstein

Elyse Goldstein

Rabbi Elyse Goldstein founded City Shul (www.cityshul.com), downtown Toronto's Reform congregation, in 2011 after 20 years as Rabbinic Director of Kolel. She is the volunteer and founding Rabbi of Adat Israel: Asociacion Judía Reformista de Guatemala and has officiated at over 30... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 3:30pm - 4:15pm
P120

3:30pm

A Trial that Changed the Course of Social History
Dreyfus. It's a name that we all know and a story that we all know bits of. We choose to present the Dreyfus Affair because we believe that it's a story that includes a pointed warning and reminder of just how fragile the standards of civilized conduct prove to me in moments of national panic. Although this is a story that took place in the immediate shadow of the monument of modernity - the Eiffel Tower - and one of the first tests of modern pluralist liberalism and its institutions, it is a portent for all of us today with antisemitism on the rise once again.

Speakers
avatar for Sylvia Solomon

Sylvia Solomon

Dr. Sylvia Solomon is a retired educator with over thirty years in elementary schools, secondary schools, and several universities including the University of Toronto and Queens University. The last fourteen years of her career she worked at the Ontario Ministry of Education developing... Read More →
avatar for David Wintre

David Wintre

David Wintre is a retired businessman who has had a lifelong interest in history, philosophy, politics and law. He brings his intellectual curiosity, knowledge and presentation skills to each lecture. David has presented at the University of Toronto, Ryerson University and George... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 3:30pm - 4:15pm
J130

3:30pm

From Generation to Generation: The Changing Nature of Judaism from the 20th to the 21st Century
Join father and son, two prominent North American rabbis, in a discussion on how Jewish identity and engagement has changed and is changing over the course of their, and our experience. We will look at data from communal studies, from our experience as rabbis and examine Jewish texts to explore the nature of change and how Judaism has always adapted to its contemporary circumstances.

Speakers
avatar for Steve Wernick

Steve Wernick

Rabbi Steven C. Wernick is the Anne and Max Tanenbaum Sr. Rabbi of Beth Tzedec Congregation in Toronto. He was previously the CEO of USCJ, the network of 600 Conservative congregations throughout North America where he spearheaded a significant turnaround emphasizing leadership development... Read More →
avatar for Eugene Wernick

Eugene Wernick

Rabbi Eugene A. Wernick was appointed rabbi of Or Olam as of August 1, 2015. A magna cum laude graduate of City College and member of Phi Beta Kappa, he received his master’s and doctoral degrees, as well as his Rabbinic S’michah, from The Jewish Theological Seminary. He presided... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 3:30pm - 4:15pm
P115

3:30pm

A Muted Religious Renaissance: Orthodox Belief and Critical Biblical Scholarship
A proliferation of secular scholarship on the Bible is incompatible with traditionally held views about its origins, its historical accuracy, and its divinity. In the past few decades, Orthodox thinkers have gained momentum in challenging the assumptions of such scholarship and in unearthing findings from that scholarship that concord with, and serve to affirm, traditional views. We will examine some of the assumptions on which secular scholarship is based and explore some examples of orthodox intellectual creativity. Amid the proliferation and clamor of academic bible scholarship, we may spy the modest flowering of a religious renaissance.

Speakers
avatar for Jesse Shore

Jesse Shore

Jesse Shore is graduate of Yeshiva University where he pursued a Masters in Bible and Rabbinic Ordination. His interests are in analytic philosophy and rabbinic literature. He currently serves as the assistant rabbi for Shaarei Shomayim Congregation in Toronto.


Sunday November 10, 2019 3:30pm - 4:15pm
J230

3:30pm

Kosher Concubines
In the 16th century, Rabbi Jacob Emden writes a fascinating responsum encouraging the revival of the concubine (pilegesh), a relationship not practiced in Judaism since the time of the Bible. We'll review the category, examine his responsum, and ask questions about its relevance today. A fascinating look at Judaism, sex, gender, and human nature.

Speakers
avatar for Jarrod Grover

Jarrod Grover

Senior Rabbi of Beth Tikvah Synagogue in Toronto, President of the Rabbinical Assembly of Ontario.


Sunday November 10, 2019 3:30pm - 4:15pm
J125

3:30pm

Comforting Mourners: Where Jewish Law and Common Sense Intersect
When we hear about a death in our family or community, too often we focus on the mourner's obligations according to Jewish law. In this session, we will examine communal obligations toward mourners. In addition, we will spend time focusing on comforting mourners on Shabbat and cases when mourning is cut short due to Festivals.

Speakers
avatar for Robyn Fryer Bodzin

Robyn Fryer Bodzin

For ten years, Rabbi Robyn Fryer Bodzin led the Israel Center of Conservative Judaism in Queens, NY with dynamicTorah learning and hesed. This past August, Rabbi Fryer Bodzin returned to her home and native land, joining the Beth Tzedec Spiritual Leadership Team as Associate Rabbi... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 3:30pm - 4:15pm
J225

4:30pm

Stories to Heal a Broken World


Featuring ancient and modern stories, from Jewish sources, reflecting Jewish values, that contains a message of universal peace, love and hope. Many of the modern stories revolve around the courage of the Jewish victims of Nazi tyranny, and the Righteous Among The Nations who tried to rescue them.
Interspersed with the presentation will be musical selections performed by celebrated Toronto singer and Habonim Cantor, Aviva Rajsky, reflecting the same values of peace, love an hope contained within each of the stories

Speakers
avatar for Eli Rubenstein

Eli Rubenstein

Eli Rubenstein (born 1959) is a Holocaust educator, writer and filmmaker. He is currently the religious leader of Congregation Habonim Toronto a Toronto synagogue founded by Holocaust survivors. He is also the National Director of March of the Living Canada,]Director of Education... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 4:30pm - 5:15pm
J130

4:30pm

Mathematics and Mishna
Ancient rabbinic texts make use of a surprising variety of sophisticated mathematical concepts. In this hands-on, interactive session we will explore a few of my favourite examples of this phenomenon. Hebrew texts will be accompanied by English translations, and no prior experience studying either mathematics or mishna is required!

Speakers
avatar for Adina Gamse

Adina Gamse

Adina Gamse moved to Toronto in 2016 after receiving a PhD in Mathematics from Northeastern University. She is currently a Lecturer in the Mathematics department at the University of Toronto Mississauga. She has many years of experience teaching mathematics and particularly enjoys... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 4:30pm - 5:15pm
J230

4:30pm

Campus
TBA

Speakers
avatar for Hilly Adler

Hilly Adler

Hilly Adler is a second year Political Science student at York University. He is passionate about interfaith and intercultural initiatives and has been successful in finding shared values among different student groups. In a joint Israeli and Palestinian initiative, Hilly has led... Read More →
LC

Levi Cassidy

Levi Cassidy is an MA candidate at the University of Toronto currently studying Russian Literature, in collaboration with the Centre for Jewish Studies. An active member of the Toronto Jewish community, Levi can be found wherever positive debate and dialogue are to be had.
avatar for Shirel Korobkin

Shirel Korobkin

Shirel Korobkin is a fourth year student at Ryerson university completing her Bachelors of Technology through the Graphic Communications Management program. She has a special interest in Packaging and Colour Management. Upon completing a Jewish Leadership and Advocacy course through... Read More →
avatar for Sofia Freudenstein

Sofia Freudenstein

Sofia Freudenstein is a third year student pursuing a double major in Jewish Studies and Philosophy at the University of Toronto. She's actively involved in Hillel at UofT, was a multifaith intern last year, and was an intern for the organization Ayeka this past summer in Israel... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 4:30pm - 5:15pm
J225

4:30pm

Are you a Particularist or Universalist?
From Abraham to Rav Kook, our sacred texts confront the tensions between these two Jewish outlooks on the world and insist that we mustn’t give up on one another.

Speakers
avatar for Yael Splansky

Yael Splansky

Yael Splansky is the Senior Rabbi of Holy Blossom Temple, Toronto’s first synagogue.From the Boston area, she came to Toronto in 1998 after ordination from Hebrew Union College – Jewish Institute of Religion in Cincinnati, Ohio.Rabbi Splansky is committed to life-long learning... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 4:30pm - 5:15pm
P120

4:30pm

Race in Judaism: It's Complicated
I would like to believe that Judaism is not racist - but the Torah appears to assign people traits based on their ethnic heritage. Let's look at some examples, and ask what that means for Jews who are both loyal to Jewish tradition, and members of a progressive society.

Speakers
avatar for Mordechai Torczyner

Mordechai Torczyner

Rabbi Mordechai Torczyner is the Rosh Beit Midrash (dean) of Yeshiva University Torah MiTzion Beit Midrash Zichron Dov, a resource for community education which offers a broad range of classes, but specializes in programs for local university students, women and professionals. Nearly... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 4:30pm - 5:15pm
P105

4:30pm

The Rabbi and The Ethicist; Wearing Different Hats
TBA


Speakers
avatar for Lila Kagedan

Lila Kagedan

Rabbi Lila Kagedan is a dual Canadian and American citizen, the first Orthodox woman to adopt the title of rabbi. Rabbi Kagedanholds degrees and certificates from Midreshet Lindenbaum, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The University of Toronto, Harvard University, The Medstar Washington... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 4:30pm - 5:15pm
P115

4:30pm

Our Bodies, Ourselves: Judaism & Reproductive Justice
What is reproductive justice and what does it have to do with Judaism? What does Jewish law and tradition have to say about women's reproductive choices? We will discuss the intersection of these issues and learn more about how we can advocate for women's bodily autonomy and choice from a progressive faith-based lens.

Speakers
avatar for Chelsea Garbell

Chelsea Garbell

Chelsea Garbell works at the intersection of religion, gender, and peace and security. She currently serves as research scholar and program manager at the Applied Research Collective for American Jewry at NYU, where she also oversees the Interfaith Entrepreneur Fellowship. She has... Read More →


Sunday November 10, 2019 4:30pm - 5:15pm
J125

5:30pm

Limmud After Party
Sunday November 10, 2019 5:30pm - 6:30pm
Atrium